Duke Robillard

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Jumpin' Blues


Lesson 4

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Jumpin' Blues > Lesson 4

Hello again folks. This weeks lesson is the final lesson for Jumpin' the Blues. In this lesson I talk about soloing in the Key of F which is a key that is a bit harder because you really need to work out of different positions to be able to say more in this style of blues playing. The things I play are quite simple and the emphasis is on the swing feel and a simple melodic approach. There a some examples here of riffs that I use but I leave it to you to find your way for improvising here. As I always say, you can't play it if it's not in your head. And to build a vocabulary to solo on a tune like this you should look up different versions of this tune and hear how different artists approach soloing on it. Most people play it in F so that in itself is a good thing. Find as many swinging blues in F as you can and learn some lines from different solos then try and take what you've learned and use parts of what you have learned to play it you're own way. That is, in my opinion, the best way to learn, but keep in mind you need to let the masters playing seep into your sub-conscious until you hear music in your head from the sources with your own twists. You'll know when you are getting close. Just keep working at it and you will start to feel the improvement.

Topics and/or subjects covered in this lesson:
Swing

Print Print Chords & Tab

loop @ 2:58 to practice the first IV chord riffs

 

loop @ 3:30 to practice 2nd position riffing

 

loop @ 4:03 to practice the F9 riffs

 

loop @ 5:38 to practice with the first run through

 

loop @ 7:19 to practice with the last run through

 

loop @ 9:06 to practice the ending

 

Finally, below is the backing track to practice with.  

 

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John Page
John Page Oct 03, 2014

I am trying to follow the riffs;is tab available?

Mike Caren
Mike Caren Oct 03, 2014

Hi John --- we don't have tab for this lesson.  That said, we can make some.  Is there a particular section / run-through that you're looking for?

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Mar 13, 2012

Hi Roger, Sounds great, good work! just be careful not to rush the asending/decending line at the end. very good! Duke

Roger
Roger Mar 12, 2012

Duke, thanks so much for teaching me this great tune after I've been butchering it for 25 years! Here is my attempt at the Jumpin Blues outro. Thanks in advance for your feedback.

 

Roger

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Mar 01, 2012

Hi Slim, My jazz trio CD 'Wobble Walkin'" is available now and detail are available at www.blueduchessrecords.com thanks, Duke 

Slim
Slim Feb 29, 2012

Duke,

     What is the status of the jazz trio record?  Is there a release date, etc?  Can you give us any details-tunes covered, gear used, anything?

Slim

Slim
Slim Feb 29, 2012

Mike,

     To be specific:  I watch the whole video, then I go back and watch again, stopping at whatever sounds interesting.  Sometimes it not the example Duke is highlighting.  Sometimes it's a lick or phrase in between that catches my ear.  I'll try to zero in, and figure it out. 

     It takes time.  Sometimes I've worked days on a measure of music until it feels good to me.  Like it's something that I can summon up at any time.  It takes a long time to get to that point.

 

Slim

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Feb 29, 2012

Slim/Mike, Certain types of music works better in my opinion for learning note for note solos. Certainly uptempo swinging stuff with several choruses of solos you want to be able to improvise and it's the real essence of this music to improvise and respond to the other musicians you are playing with. It's very important to play with other musicians if you really want to play swing, jazz and/or blues. The communication between the players is often what determines what you play and the level of 3 or 4 great musicians improvising is one of the most special of all musical feelings. it's something magic that can't be achieved by playing to a track. It's a form of telepathy when it's really happening that is like no other feeling.

 

Mike Caren
Mike Caren Feb 29, 2012

Hi Slim .. what you say makes a lot of sense.  It's great to get your perspective as you're a stronger player than I am.  

It would be great to understand how you use the lessons.  Some questions on my mind are

1. Do you watch the whole video first and just "get it" ?

2. Do you use the set loop points .. or make your own?

3. Do you listen for a bit .. hit stop .. and then experiment with the thought / concept Duke share to make it your own?

Really appreciate the time / detail as this helps me to make the experience work for players at your level.

Thanks!

 

Slim
Slim Feb 29, 2012

Mike,

     Simply, the learning is more active, less passive.  In other words, instead of learning a solo note for note, you're given "road signs"; building blocks for creating your OWN solos.  Because that's what it's all about, no?  Duke, correct me if I'm wrong, but when you were young, I'm sure you sat in front of a record player, radio, or tape recorder learning solos of your favorite musicians.  But what you play now is not note for note of what you learned then.  You've internalized it, put it through your mojo filter.

     It's fantastic to learn the moves of a master.  But, then you have to take the next step of making that come out in your playing as something unique.  Something that's yours.  And that's not something that you can easily teach.  You need to spend time alone, making those moves yours.

     Don't misunderstand me.  I'm a big believer in learning something EXACTLY like it's played.  It's almost like an actor creating a role.  You really learn alot getting inside another player's head, and thinking like they thought.  But, after that, you need to make it yours.

     Not all the work is like that.  Some things stand on their own, like Blues After Hours.  When I play gigs, some stuff is note for note, but some stuff is just going for it.

Slim

Mike Caren
Mike Caren Feb 29, 2012

@Slim .. Glad you like the approach on this one.  Can you tell me a bit more about how you learn / practice from a lesson like this.  I want to make sure I understand so we build on this.

Great to get everyone else's thoughts too.  Thanks!

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Feb 25, 2012

Thanks Slim, I prefer to provide starting points to jump off from with examples of what you "Could" play rather than copy mine or someone elses solo.

Slim
Slim Feb 25, 2012

Duke,

     Thanks so much for that lesson.  I think this approach to soloing is more useful than the "note for note".  There is alot there to dig in and chew on.  Love it.

Slim

 
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