Duke Robillard

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Honky Tonk


Lesson 3

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Honky Tonk > Lesson 3

This week folks we cover the second and third choruses of the guitar solo on Honky Tonk. The second chorus starts with an arpeggio on D minor which serves as the one chord here. Then we take the A on the high E string back a half tone to Ab to make the 4 change (Bb) while keeping the arpeggiated triplet going. Then moving back to the A note for the F arpeggio for one more measure before we go to the riff that everyone gets wrong. It is actually quite simple but unusual like all Billy Butler's solos. It's a perfect composition and one hardly anyone gets right so I am here to show you the correct way to play it. The rest of the chorus is simple blues riffs played with Billy's unusual sense of time and phrasing. The 3rd chorus is an exercise in right hand mandolin style tremolo picking and and sixth chord melody. Lots to work on here, good luck and enjoy!

Duke

Topics and/or subjects covered in this lesson:
roots
Duke Robillard
Honky Tonk
Billy Butler

Print Print Chords & Tab

Background listening: Honky Tonk by Bill Doggett

loop @ 1:00 solo 2nd chorus (D minor chorus) breakdown

loop @ 6:28 solo 2nd chorus slowly

$1.5 $2.6 $3.7 $1.5 $2.6 $3.7 $1.5 $2.6 $3.7 $1.5 $2.6 $3.7 | $1.4 $2.6 $3.7 $1.4 $2.6 $3.7 $1.4 $2.6 $3.7 $1.4 $2.6 $3.7 |
$1.5 $2.6 $3.7 $1.5 $2.6 $3.7 $1.5 $2.6 $3.7 $1.5 $2.6 $3.7 | $1.10 $1.8 $2.8\6 $4.10 $4.9 $4.8 $4.7 $1.8^v 6 |
$2.8^v 6 $4.8 $3.6h7 $1.8^v 6 | $2.8^v 6 $4.8 $3.6h7 $1.3^v 1 |
$2.3^v 1 $4.3 $3.1h2 $5.3 $5.5 $4.3 $4.5 $5.5 | $4.3 $4.3 $4.5/7 $3.5 $4.10 $3.7 8 |
/9 $1.8 $3.9 $1.8 $3.9 $1.8 $3.9 $1.8 $3.9 $1.8 $1.7 $3.8 | $1.7 $1.6 $3.7 $1.6 $3.7 $1.6 $3.7 $1.4\1 4 1 $2.4 $1.1 |
$1.1 $1.1 $1.1 $2.4 $2.1 $1.1 $2.4 $2.1 $3./4 $3.3 $3.1 | $4.3 $4.3 $4.3 $4.3 $4.1 $5.3 |

loop @ 7:40 3rd chorus breakdown

loop @ 10:59 3rd chorus V chord

loop @ 13:39 3rd chorus slowly (2 times)

$2.10.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 $2. 10.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 | $2.9.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 $2. 9.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 |
$2./10.$1./8 $3. 7.$2.6 $2.6.$1.5 $2./10.$1./8 | $2./10.$1./8 $2./10.$1./8 $3. 7.$2.6 $2.6.$1.5 |
$2.9.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 $2. 9.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 | $2.9.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 $2. 9.$1.8 $2. 15.$1.13 |
$2./10.$1./8 $3. 7.$2.6 $2.6.$1.5 $2./10.$1./8 | $2./10.$1./8 $2./10.$1./8 $3. 7.$2.6 $2.6.$1.5 |
$3./9.$2./10.$1./8 $3./9.$2./10.$1./8 $3./9.$2./10.$1./8 $3.9.$2.10.$1.8 $3.8.$2.9.$1.7 $3.7.$2.8.$1.6 | $3./7.$2./8.$1./6 $3./7.$2./8.$1./6 $3./7.$2./8.$1./6 $3.7.$2.8.$1.8 $3.6.$2.7.$1.5 $3.5.$2.6.$1.4 $2.1 $3.4 $3.3 $3.1 $3.2 |
$4.3 $4.3 $3.h2 $2.1 $3.4 $3.3 $2.1 $2.3 $1.1 $1.3^v | 1 $2.3^v 1 |

Backing Track

 

 

 

Comments

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Steve Lauder
Steve Lauder May 04, 2014

I think I'm comfortable with the meat of Honky Tonk, I know i need to tighten up the turn arounds which will be the focus for lesson 4, where again I am good with the main parts of the song. I'd really like to ease more into jazz/blues. I listened to Lester' Leap which i may no be ready for. Perhaps more 2,5,1 such as Satin Doll before the 6,3,5,1 (?) progressions.

 

 

Steve Lauder
Steve Lauder May 03, 2014

 

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Nov 16, 2012

Hi Duke,

Sorry, I meant "Background listening: Honky Tonk by Bill Doggett"

I was asking about a lick that is not part of the lesson-- just something cool on the recording

Thanks

P

 

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Nov 16, 2012

Peter, When you say reference recording I am not sure what you mean? Duke

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Nov 16, 2012

Thanks Duke,

I was referring to the pattern played at 5:00 in the reference recording, and at 5:35 in the live version I posted.  It is part of the ending of the piece.

I think it is a very simple repeating lick-- I can't get it, but it's a great effect.

Thanks for the great lesson

P

 

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Nov 15, 2012

Hi Peter, I play that riff a bit slower at 7:10 and it might be eaiser to figure out from watching it from there. It starts with sliding down on the E string from Ab to F. Duke

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Nov 15, 2012

Hi Daddyray, I use my thumb and index finger mostly but when I use a pick and fingers too I use my middle finger in combination with the pick. Duke

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Nov 12, 2012

Here's another version of Honkey Tonk

The solo is almost exactly the same, but I find the phases a bit more distinct.  It helped me understand the phrasing.

Enjoy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wHHkrcr0eI&feature=watch-vrec

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Nov 12, 2012

Hey Duke,

What is the great lick starting at 5:00?  It sounds simple, but I can't quite reproduce it.

Thanks

P

 
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