Duke Robillard

Lesson >


All Your Love


Intro and Fills

Duke Robillard Lesson >

All Your Love > Intro and Fills

Hi Friends,

This week we are going to learn the opening chorus lead part for "All Your Love." Mike shows you exactly how to play it measure by measure to get the real vibe of how Otis Rush played it on the original recording of it. It's one of the most revered intros in all of blues guitar and Mike attention to detail shows you the way.

I know you will have fun with this one.

Enjoy!

Duke

 

 

Topics and/or subjects covered in this lesson:
Chicago Blues
Eric Clapton
Duke Robillard
Otis Rush
Monster Mike Welch
All Your Love

Backing Track

Print Print Chords & Tab

Loop 1:05 Otis Rush's Approach to Soloing

Loop 1:47 Breakdown of Intro

$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. | $1. $1. $1. $1. $3./17 $1. $1. $1. $3.\4 $1. $3.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.4 $1. |
$3.2^ $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. | $1. $1. $1. $1. $5.2 $5.h4 $1. $1. $5.4 $4.2 $1. $4.h4 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.4 $1. |
$3.2^ $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. | $1. $1. $1. $1. $3./17 $1. $1. $1. $3.\4 $1. $3.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.4 $1. |
$3.2 $3.h4 $3.^ $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. | $1. $1. $1. $1. $5.2 $5.h4 $5.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.h4 $1. $3.2^ $1. $1. $1. |
$3./6 $1. $2.5 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.6\.$2.5\ $1. $1. $1. | $3.4.$2.3 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $5.2 $5.2 $5.2 $1. $4.0 $1. $5.2 $1. $5.0 $1. |
$6.2 $1. $1. $1. $6.x $1. $6.0 $6.0 $6.2 $1. $5.0 $1. $6.2 $1. $6.0 $1. | $6.2 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |

 

Loop 7:07 Practice Loop of Last Six Bars of Intro 

Loop 7:22 Breakdown of Fills

Loop 9:25 Practice Loop of Fills

$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.2.$2.2.$1.2 $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. | $4.4 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |
$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.2.$2.2.$1.2 $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. | $3.2 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |
$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.2.$2.2.$1.2 $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. | $3.2 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |
$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.2.$2.2.$1.2 $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. | $4.4 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |
$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.2.$2.2.$1.2 $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. | $3.2 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |
$1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $3.2.$2.2.$1.2 $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. $4.4 $1. $4.2 $1. | $4.4 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |

 

Loop 9:55 Closing Thoughts

 

 

 

Comments

Log in to leave a comment



Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Jun 17, 2015

Hey Bruce, That's cool that you found a technique of Mike's in "All Your Love" that works for Flying Home! It's true that what work's for one may not work for another. My feeling is if it sounds goo,d than it is right. Of course you have to use discerning ears with that statement. Duke

Monster Mike Welch
Monster Mike Welch Jun 17, 2015

Here's the missing phrase - sorry about that! Hope this helps. 

Bruce Dumes
Bruce Dumes Jun 17, 2015

That's terrific, Mike. Thanks a lot! Much appreciated.

Bruce Dumes
Bruce Dumes Jun 16, 2015

Hi Mike and Duke -

Great stuff! I love all the nuances of Otis' playing that you've been able to capture and really appreciate your sharing them. Thanks so much!

Just a couple of points I wanted to mention. I believe you left out a phrase. It's very similar to the other licks, but some folks might be confused when they run out of notes too early. ;-) The missing phrase is played after it goes to the IV chord and leads you back down to the I. Then you play the riff that you have that leads up to double stop at the V chord.

And by the way, in my listening, and not trying to be pedantic or anything :-), Otis does NOT do the double stop slide down, though Clapton does something like that in his version. However, it's a very cool riff and sounds fantastic. Definitely one to steal! :-)

Thanks again!

Bruce

Monster Mike Welch
Monster Mike Welch Jun 16, 2015

Ah! I could have sworn I covered that phrase. Casualty of first time jitters, I guess. Sorry about that!

Bruce Dumes
Bruce Dumes Jun 16, 2015

No worries! You're doing a great job, I'm learning a heck of a lot from you already. It probably seemed like a small thing to you, but when you mentioned about doing the upstroke on the 16th note skip on the previous lesson -- it actually was a huge revelation for me. I've been struggling with Duke's lesson on "Flying Home", the great Charlie Christian/Benny Goodman tune. I've spent maybe a month working on it, and havent been able to get the phrasing right on the head when I play it up to speed. After your comment I realized that I was trying to do it all in downstrokes, and it's just way too fast to get the swing feel doing all downstrokes -- at least for me. So because of your comment, I re-thought it, and I'm now making great progress on it. Thanks so much, Mike! 

Monster Mike Welch
Monster Mike Welch Jun 17, 2015

It's amazing how much of a difference little alterations in technique can make. Charlie allegedly played with all downstrokes, but you know, he was Charlie Christian and I'm not. Everyone's hands are different, too - I know from playing with Duke that he and I sometimes have COMPLETELY different technical approaches to making basically similar sounds. It boils down to what works for you.

I put a quick video with that missing phrase above - hope it helps.

It's funny about the double stop thing; I've never been a note-for-note guy (so this experience was at least as instructive for me as it was for anybody), but I've heard so many versions of that song and played that song so many times that once I got in front of the camera, some of the note-for-note went out the window and I ended up playing it the way I thought I remembered it. Clapton definitely did the slide down, but I know I also heard Otis live versions with that part in it. If I do this video lesson thing again, I might not try to go AS note-for-note as I did here - it would give me a slightly wider margin of error!

EDIT: Huh. Just listened to the intro of about seven different Otis live versions, and he never does that (although sometimes if there's a rhythm guitarist, they're doing something similar). Must be a holdover from the Mayall/Clapton version. This is the humbling part of the experience, I guess.

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Jun 13, 2015

Hi peter, You will have to ask Mike about the track but it is a blues Rumba going to a medium temo shuffle. duke

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Jun 13, 2015

Excellent!  Thank you Mike

This is a question sort of outside guitar playing...  what are the drums doing?

I want to set up my drum machine to mimic that rhythm.  Can you (or anyone else) give me a pattern, or an appropriate link.

Thanks

P

Mike Caren
Mike Caren Jun 13, 2015

Hi Peter --- backing track is up with the right rhythm --- thanks.

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Jun 13, 2015

Terrific.  Thanks Mike (original Mike).  How was that created?  Can you post/email the MIDI (or whatever) file so I can slow it down for practice.

Thanks

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Jun 13, 2015

Nevermind.  I found the MP3 and slowed it down.  

If anyone wants a slow version let me know.

P.S. This is a great new feature.  It really helps to understand how the guitar fits in with the rest of the band.  Thank you

charlie
charlie Jun 13, 2015

Great lessons Mike! And Duke I hope your shoulders healing up.

I thought I really knew this song, but you've opened it up for me completley - starting with the key, now the intro - turns out I really didn't know it at all! Can't wait to see what comes next.

Otis Cobra recordings were some of the first blues I heard as a kid - they blew me away then and they haven't stopped since! There's something mystical/strange about the sound of those recordings that makes them stand apart from everything else being done at the time or since. Guess that a bunch of them being in a minor key adds to the almost spooky sound. And the use of the tremolo bar on a bunch (not so much this tune I think, but i could be wrong) I really appreciate the way you talked about the merged sound of the two guitars in your last lesson. Were they going thru the same amp perhaps? 

Really good to have you here on Sonic Junction. 

Monster Mike Welch
Monster Mike Welch Jun 15, 2015

Thanks! I don't know about the amp situation at Cobra, other than that Otis' amp was a Danelectro Challenger currently owned by a friend of mine in Chicago. It's possible that Ike Turner was playing through that amp or another like it, but one of the things most people don't talk about when it comes to gear is that a lot of amps sound basically similar. 

The crazy whammy bar playing on "Double Trouble" is Ike, and Otis is playing with the finger vibrato. "All Your Love" has a pretty clear rhythm/lead division of duties, but a bunch of those tunes have two lead guitars, harmonica, and saxophone all winding their way through the sonic stew. It's a cool sound. In general, Ike's playing is more jagged and raw. 

 
Login-popup-sm Login-popup-banner

Member Log In

Forgot your password? Click here

New To Sonic Junction?


See Sign Up Info >

Popup-close
 
Login-popup-sm

New To Sonic Junction?

Try 2 Lessons Free

Popup-close