Duke Robillard

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Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You


Solo - Last A Section

Duke Robillard Lesson >

Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You > Solo - Last A Section

Hello Folks, this weeks lesson is the final one for "Gee Baby, Ain't I good for you." We learn a final A section simple solo with a tag to make a bluesy ending. I am really looking forward to hearing you solo on it and play the chord melody. Send videos and sound clips and remember, if there is something I can help you with just send a message to me.

Hope you all are having a great holiday season!

Cheers, Duke

Topics and/or subjects covered in this lesson:
standards
T-Bone Walker
Duke Robillard
Kenny Burrell
Nat King Cole
Gee Baby Ain't I Good to You

Backing Track

Print Print Chords & Tab

Gee Baby, Aint I Good To You background listening: Kenny BurrellNat King Cole and T-Bone Walker

loop @ 0:56 Run-Through of Final A Section Solo with Tag Ending

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$4./5.$3./6 $1. $2.5 $2.8 $1. $1.5 $1.5h6p5 $1. $2.8 $1.5 $1. $2.8 | $1.5h7 $2.3 $1. $1. $3h5 $1. $1.3 $1.5^ $1. $1.5 $1.3 $2.3 $2.5 |
$1.3 $1. $2.5h6 $2.3 $2.5h6 $2.3 $4.5 $3./6.$2./6 $3.\5.$2.\5 $4.5 $3.3h4 | $4.5 $1. $6.4 $4.4.$3.5.$2.6.$1.6 $1. $1.3.$4.3.$3.4.$2.5.$1.5 $1. $1. $1. $1. $1. |

loop @ 1:40 Breakdown of Final A Section Solo and Tag Ending

loop @ 8:21 Closing Thoughts

 

Backing Track

 

 

Comments

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Marty Perry
Marty Perry Jan 05, 2014

Hi Duke,

My first attempt at a video… The tune is still a work in progress but it's starting to come together. Thanks so much for these lessons. I've been a fan since I walked into a bar in Fairport NY and saw you playing back in the 80's.
 
Marty
Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Jan 18, 2014

Hi Marty, You sound very good here.Now you should try to do a solo without using my example and playing around each chord change. a good tip would be think major scale with not a lot of emphesis on the 7ths trough most of the changes. try to make your own melody with it. Good work! Duke

Dduke 

Peter Wolf
Peter Wolf Jan 01, 2014

Happy New Year Duke!

I want to continue to work on "Gee Babe, Ain't I Good to You", or at least I want to understand it better

I learned the chords and melody, but then got lost on the solo.  Apart from altering the melody, or copying your licks, it's hard to know what notes and chords to use. 

I tried to figure out the appropriate scales and target notes from the chord tones, and got all confused.

How do you think about this song?  The A section seems to end in G, but does not begin in that key, and the bridge is in... what...?

I am wondering if there is a much simpler way to think about this song.  Why is a blues?  It sounds like blues.  Is it really just a bunch of chord substitutions making a standard I IV V sequence more Jazzy?

I'm hoping that there is something simple under all the pretty decorations

Cheers

P

 

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Jan 18, 2014

Hi Peter,I'll do my best to explain it. First of all the song is in the key of G. In the old American popular song form a song was comprised of usually 16 or 32 bars which made up a chorus. That form was repeated however many times necessary. Sometimes an introduction comprised of a often different set of chords was used to set a song up. As far as an ending some part of the chords could be used differently for an exteneded ending often called a tag ending. That is what we have here in my version. We go to the 3 minor 7th chord (Bm7) then to the 6 (E7) then extend the 2 chord (A7) a whole measure instead of just 2 beats then play the 5 chord (D7) for one measure (also call "bar") to the stop on G then we do a typical blues ending. It's important that you understand the form before you try and improvise over it which is what you are looking to do it seems. Eis just the first chord of this progression. Unlike blues and rock and a lot of rock and roll, the root chord (chord that represents the key of a song) is often not the first chord of a song. Hope this helps, Duke 

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Dec 28, 2013

Thanks Mattia! Duke 

mattia miglioli
mattia miglioli Dec 27, 2013

Thank you Duke!!!!! it's always a pleasure read your comment!! you make my day!!! i 'm workin hard , listenin your cd and tryin with the backin track!! Wobble Walkin it's an amazing resource of high music!! see you soon! ;)

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Dec 27, 2013

Hi Markod, When I learnt this I wanted to sing it and G was the vocal key that worked for me. That's why I do it in G. I recorded it for my Wobble Walkin' album in Db and it was sung by Mickey Freeman and Db was her key. Duke 

Duke Robillard
Duke Robillard Dec 27, 2013

Hi Mattia, That's a very good start! A few of your licks I'd like to learn! Looking forward to hearing more. Ciao, Duke 

mattia miglioli
mattia miglioli Dec 26, 2013

 Hello everybody,Hi Mr. Duke! this is my first step of puttin all together..hope jou enjoy..chin chin ;)

Mark
Mark Dec 22, 2013

Great tune ! Just curious why you changed the key to G. The Kenny Burrell, T Bone Walker and Nat King Cole version are in the key of Eb.

 

 
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