Chris Eldridge

Lesson >


Gold Rush


Second Solo and Moving Up the Neck

The second solo in Gold Rush employs a classic Tony Rice up-the-neck position. We'll learn a slick way to transition from open position to the 7th fret using an open string as a "pivot point." We'll also learn a few more classic open-position Tony Rice-isms.

Chris

 

 

 

Topics and/or subjects covered in this lesson:
Bluegrass
Chris Eldridge
Tony Rice
Gold Rush
Bill Monroe

Print Print Chords & Tab

Loop 0:25 Breakdown of Soloing Up the Neck

Loop 5:20 A Section Solo (First Part)

 

Download the Sheet Music PDF

 

Loop 5:42 Solo Breakdown

Loop 14:25 Closing Thoughts

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Log in to leave a comment



Kip Marchetti
Kip Marchetti Mar 14, 2016

Chris - thanks. I think with this lesson I didn't spend a sufficient amount of time with you and the tabs. I'm not a huge tab guy but there is something to be said for using them. There are things I'm playing wrong/diferently  early on. I fixed that today. I just kind of jumped in and figured if I got close to what you were doing it was good enough. Now that I've been hanging around here for several months I think I would benefit from just starting over from lesson one. You told me once or twice there is no rush. I'm gonna finally take that advice. BTW Avalon is great. If you ever play close by I'd like to come and check it out.

Kip Marchetti
Kip Marchetti Feb 06, 2016

 

In the latter half of the 1st solo - I feel compelled to play it like I do in take # 2 and # 4 of this short video but I believe you want me to play it the way I do in take #1 and # 3. Does it matter and am I doing take # 1 and # 3 correctly as you intended?

Pick direction is a constrant struggle as I found on your next lesson Cross Picking on Banks of the Ohio but I'm working on it and trying to enjoy the journey. Also, you did say you enjoy checking in and helping out ... I don't want to be a pest but I've spent a lot of time with this lesson and would like to get it close. 

Chris Eldridge
Chris Eldridge Mar 14, 2016

Kip, for some reason I missed this video when you posted it before. But I'm glad I found it because it pertains to the most recent one that you uploaded for Gold Rush. You are right, you should mostly play it the way you do it in #1 and #3 which are mostly right. #2 and 4# take some liberties with the timing that are too much. There is an issue with 1 and 3 though: that first G note happens 3 times instead of 2. That means that everything that followed in your version was early by 1 16th note until you pause and correct at 0:08. If you play that first G note 3 times but do everything else the same (after you play that 3rd note, your right hand will be a mirror image of what you've been playing because of the extra note) you will come out correctly and not have to pause at the end.

Kip Marchetti
Kip Marchetti Jan 29, 2016

This is a video of ol' strummer Kip practicing Gold Rush (if it works).  Feel free to encourage me ha ha ... I've never been much of a picker but with the help of this site and Chris teaching I'm trying to get the hang of it. 

Kip Marchetti
Kip Marchetti Jan 29, 2016

Chris Eldridge
Chris Eldridge Feb 03, 2016

Kip, great job! I love how you're playing the melody your own way but still sticking to the essence of what I taught. Fantastic. Also, I really love the spirit behind how you're playing. I can tell you love it and that's really important. I have a few constructive comments:

- You've done the hard work of figuring out all of the notes and how to play them. That's great but the timing/phrasing of the first and second solos are off by a bit and that's causing a few beats to be added and/or dropped in a few places. Try going back to the openings of the two lessons, slowing them down to 50% and playing along. That should illuminate the spots where you're getting off. If you're having trouble don't worry about trying to play it on the guitar - make sure you can sing/hum it. Once you can do that, putting it on the guitar will be pretty easy because you've already done most of the work of figuring out where the notes are and how to play them.

-Your pick direction is getting turned around at times. For instance, the 'taters at the beginning (0:02-0:04) should all be downstrokes because you are playing 8th notes there (as opposed to the faster, alternating 16ths that follow when the melody starts at 0:04). While pick direction is important, I'd work on this after you straighten out the phrasing.

Keep up the good work!

Chris

Kip Marchetti
Kip Marchetti Jan 18, 2016

I don't know about ya'll but I have been working and working and working on this second solo and I'm nowhere close to as quick as Keenan. In fact I've just finally figured out what exactly Chris is doing. I sure love this lesson and have been having a great time learning each and every part of this song. At this point I'm not exactly sure where this solo is supposed to occur but I'll figure it out.  Sometimes I feel like I'm in way over my head - being so old and strumming my entire life - but I have found it's just a matter of practice and a great teacher like Chris. Thanks!

Chris Eldridge
Chris Eldridge Jan 22, 2016

Kip,

You'll get there! Honestly, for all of us on this music quest, me very much included, the destination is important, but the journey is really where it's at. Just take it slow.

I've included a youtube of the original version from Tony's album Church Street Blues. This particular solo starts the 3rd time through the tune at 1:02.

Best,

Chris

Keenan Hammack
Keenan Hammack Jan 11, 2016

 Wow that change to the 4 chord in the C position up high like that is really beautiful. Nickel Creek does something like that in their song Rest of My Life and I've always liked that really majory 7th feel on the 4 chord. Beautiful song.

Chris Eldridge
Chris Eldridge Jan 11, 2016

Keennan, well done. I agree a major 7th on a IV chord is a beautiful sound, particularly in folk music where there aren't a ton of 7th chords happening. It's a lovely color to have appear!

2 things: You've dropped a couple of beats - one on either side of the high 4 chord. Be sure you're always hearing the song running in your head while you're playing. If you are listening to it in your minds ear you will be much less likely to make those kinds of mistakes. Dropping a beat is the kind of mistake that you really don't want to make. It affects the flow and interferes with the listener much more than if you're simply off by a fret.

Also, it sounds try slowing down and playing it beautifully. Exaggerate this; do it in a way that you would never actually play it in real life. But see how beautiful you can make it. Odds are you'll discover some things about it that you'll want to incorporate when you're playing it up to speed.

 
Login-popup-sm Login-popup-banner

Member Log In

Forgot your password? Click here

New To Sonic Junction?

See Sign Up Info >

Popup-close
 
Login-popup-sm

New To Sonic Junction?

Try 2 Lessons Free

Popup-close